Intel To Double Core Count On 8th Gen Mobile Processors: Quad-Core Boost For Laptop Performance

If you’ve ever felt your low voltage mobile processor in your laptop or all-in-one PC lacked grunt, then Intel’s new 8th-Gen Core i5 and Core i7 U-Series processors are aimed at solving that problem.  New quad-core models sporting twice the number of processor cores and threads than their predecessors will be joining Intel’s new range of 8th-Gen products, boosting the performance of its low power U-series for starters.

Many laptops include quad-core processors, but traditionally, Intel’s low-voltage U-Series processors have topped out at two cores to promote battery life and keep heat to a minimum – important factors in laptops and all-in-one PCs where these processors are used.

Intel

Intel’s 8th Gen U-Series low power CPUs will include quad-core processors for the first time

There will be two new Core i5s and two new Core i7s in the U-Series mobile processor range, all with four cores and as they also feature Hyper-threading, all will offer eight threads too. The best you’d see from the previous generation, listed below, was two cores and four threads, so the new processors will potentially offer much better performance in a range of tasks, especially video editing, where applications are often multi-threaded and make use of additional cores, while usually performing poorly on processors with fewer than four cores.

Intel

Intel’s 7th-Gen U-Series processors were limited to two cores.

The difference between the Core i5 and Core i7 ranges is the amount of cache, with the Core i7 processors offering more. Frequencies also rise in the range too, from a base frequency of 1.6GHz with the Core i5-8250U to 1.9GHz with the Core i7-8560U. These are noticeably slower than the base frequencies of their predecessors (above), which may have a negative impact on performance in some applications, but for the most part, Intel is clearly focussing on boosting core counts across its range of processors. For example, 12, 14 16, and 18-core processors are arriving from this month for its high-edn desktop platform, while hexa-core (six-core) processors are rumored to be making their debut on its mainstream platform too.

Intel will be announcing the rest of its 8th-Gen processor lineup today and I’ll be covering the event with a discussion of any new interesting products, in particular, those for desktop PCs.